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Stress Test: Reflections on Financial Crises
By Timothy F. Geithner (Crown)
“Sensational . . . Tim’s book will forever be the definitive work on what causes financial panics and what must be done to stem them when they occur.” —Warren Buffett
 
As president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and then as President Barack Obama’s secretary of the Treasury, Timothy F. Geithner helped the United States navigate the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, from boom to bust to rescue to recovery. In a candid, riveting, and historically illuminating memoir, he takes readers behind the scenes of the crisis, explaining the hard choices and politically unpalatable decisions he made to repair a broken financial system and prevent the collapse of the Main Street economy. This is the inside story of how a small group of policy makers—in a thick fog of uncertainty, with unimaginably high stakes—helped avoid a second depression but lost the American people doing it. Stress Test is also a valuable guide to how governments can better manage financial crises, because this one won’t be the last.

By Tom Clark (Yale University Press)
Journalist Tom Clark draws on the research of a transatlantic team led by Professors Anthony Heath and Robert D. Putnam to determine the great recession’s toll on individuals, families, and community bonds in the United States and the United Kingdom. The ubiquitous metaphor of the crisis has been an all-encompassing “financial storm,” but Clark argues that the data tracks the narrow path of a tornado—destroying some neighborhoods while leaving others largely untouched. In our vastly unequal societies, disproportionate suffering is being meted out to the poor—and the book’s new analysis suggests that the scars left by unemployment and poverty will linger long after the economy recovers.

 
 
By Robert Post  (Harvard University Press)

Democracy is not just a structure of elections and political institutions, but a mysterious and historically fluid set of ideas about the relationship between citizens and those who govern. With his characteristically subtle understanding of our cultural history, Robert Post shows how changing ideas of self-government illuminate one of the great political and legal controversies of our time.—Richard H. Pildes, New York University


 
 
 
 
By George A. Akerlof, Olivier J. Blanchard, David Romer (MIT Press)
Since 2008, economic policymakers and researchers have occupied a brave new economic world. Previous consensuses have been upended, former assumptions have been cast into doubt, and new approaches have yet to stand the test of time. Policymakers have been forced to improvise and researchers to rethink basic theory. George Akerlof, Nobel Laureate and one of this volume’s editors, compares the crisis to a cat stuck in a tree, afraid to move. In April 2013, the International Monetary Fund brought together leading economists and economic policymakers to discuss the slowly emerging contours of the macroeconomic future. This book offers their combined insights.


By David C. Colander, Roland Kupers (Princeton University Press)
Complexity science--made possible by modern analytical and computational advances--is changing the way we think about social systems and social theory. Unfortunately, economists' policy models have not kept up and are stuck in either a market fundamentalist or government control narrative. While these standard narratives are useful in some cases, they are damaging in others, directing thinking away from creative, innovative policy solutions. "Complexity and the Art of Public Policy" outlines a new, more flexible policy narrative, which envisions society as a complex evolving system that is uncontrollable but can be influenced.


 
 
By Ken Adelman  (Broadside Books )

The dramatic, first-hand account of the historic 1986 Reagan-Gorbachev summit in Iceland—the definitive weekend that was the key turning point in the Cold War—by President Reagan’s arms control director, Ken Adelman.
 
Scrupulously researched and based on now-declassified documents, Reagan at Reykjavik tells the gripping tale of the weekend that changed the world. Adelman provides an honest, laser-etched portrait of President Reagan at one of his finest and most challenging moments--and, indisputably, one of the most significant triumphs of his presidency.

 
By Edward Castronova 
Wildcat Currency is not merely a blueprint for a currently amazing present, but a roadmap to a post-scarcity future….This is one of the most accessible books on economics that I have read….Castronova’s scholarship is careful and complete….Wildcat Currency is a brilliant, fresh, and accessible look not just at one of the fastest-growing online trends, but at one of humanity’s most enduring institutions:  what we mean when we say ‘money.’” - Joshua Fairfield, Professor of Law, Washington and Lee School of Law

 
 
 
 
By Mark Gerchick (Princeton University Press)
“I fully expect that some day soon I’ll be on a flight where every passenger is reading the same book: Full Upright and Locked Position. It won’t make the plane seem any less cramped, or the pricing or schedule policies any less maddening, or the security any easier to deal with. But Mark Gerchick’s clarity, knowledge, and humor will give everyone a better sense of how American air travel became such a joyless (though safe) ordeal, and what hope there is ahead.” — James Fallows, author of China Airborne and national correspondent for The Atlantic


 
 
By Thomas Piketty  (Harvard University Press)
"It seems safe to say that “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” the magnum opus of the French economist Thomas Piketty, will be the most important economics book of the year — and maybe of the decade. Mr. Piketty, arguably the world’s leading expert on income and wealth inequality, does more than document the growing concentration of income in the hands of a small economic elite. He also makes a powerful case that we’re on the way back to “patrimonial capitalism,” in which the commanding heights of the economy are dominated not just by wealth, but also by inherited wealth, in which birth matters more than effort and talent. -Paul Krugman


 
Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt
By Michael Lewis (WW Norton)
"One of the country's most popular business journalist returns to the financial world with a new book that gives readers a ringside seat as the biggest story in years prepaares to hit Wall Street

"The light that Lewis shines into the darkest corners of the financial world may not be good for your blood pressure, because if you have any contact with the market, even a retirement account, this story is happening to you. But in the end, Flash Boys is an uplifting read. Here are people who have somehow preserved a moral sense in an environment where you don t get paid for that; they have perceived an institutionalized injustice and are willing to go to war to fix it."



Cell*- (Limited Autographed Copies Available in Store)
By Robin Cook  (Putnam Press)

"With Cell Robin Cook demonstrates why he is the undisputed king of medical thrillers.  Can a smartphone app kill you? You'll believe it can after you read this story, which blasts along faster than a truckload of quad core processors. Equal measures a substantive social commentary that we will all soon have to deal with and a terrifying blood-and-guts tale of what lies right around the technology corner, Cook has delivered a home run worthy of the the writer who has consistently thrilled millions ever since his blockbuster Coma."
—David Baldacci #1 New York Times-bestselling author of King and Maxwell 

 
 
 
Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning
By Peter C. Brown, Henry L. Roediger, III, Mark A. McDaniel (Belknap Press)
“Learning is essential and life-long. Yet as these authors argue convincingly, people often use exactly the wrong strategies and don't appreciate the ones that work. We've learned a lot in the last decade about applying cognitive science to real-world learning, and this book combines everyday examples with clear explanations of the research. It's easy to read—and should be easy to learn from, too!”—Daniel L. Schacter, author of The Seven Sins of Memory

 
 
 
 
By Donald E. Canfield (Princeton University Press)

"In Oxygen, Don Canfield recounts two epics in one--the evolution of breathable air over the entirety of Earth history, and the equally engaging account of how scientists have reconstructed this history from chemical details in ancient rocks. Even those who know the story well, or think they do, will find much food for thought."
--Andrew Knoll, Harvard University, author of Life on a Young Planet: The First Three Billion Years of Evolution on Earth


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